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Project:
 © Rafal Pruszynski (
)
0 photo(s)
and 0 draft(s),
created on 16-07-2013
0 project comment(s)
,
0 photos comment(s)
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Near moving water.
Seoul, South Korea (mostly). People and places, nature and civilization.

The Han River bifurcates the city in many ways: geographically, socioeconomically and even psychologically. It also offers pretty much the only real green space in this city.
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Project:
 © Javier Sanchis (
)
10 photo(s)
and 0 draft(s),
created on 28-01-2012
3 project comment(s)
,
4 photos comment(s)
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
An experimental projet about a new way (for me) to take pictures...quickly in technical skills, but focusing all the attention on the composition and the mood. ... My first projet with an Iphone 4, and without postprocesing on the computer, only with the Iphone. 

 ;-) sorry for the nikonistes or canonistes.

Be sure that I don't forget my Nikon ;-)
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Project:
 © Didier Vanderperre (
)
1 photo(s)
and 0 draft(s),
created on 27-01-2012
0 project comment(s)
,
2 photos comment(s)
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
I was not done with my project, but could not upload any more pictures.
So here is part II.
Some off season shots during the winter, including the Polar bear Swim that takes place on New Years Day.

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Project:
 © Cheuk Hin Tsang (
)
2 photo(s)
and 0 draft(s),
created on 01-01-2012
0 project comment(s)
,
2 photos comment(s)
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
hong kong's nightlife is definitely very lively...here i'll try and showcase the different aspects of it...from shopping...eating...drinking...etc

and for extra fun im doing it all in b&w film :) 
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Project:
 © Animesh Ray (
)
0 photo(s)
and 0 draft(s),
created on 02-12-2011
0 project comment(s)
,
0 photos comment(s)
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Cities are poems made by man to dream about caves.  Cities are that corner of dark recess where the saber toothed tiger doesn't reach for fear of fire; flicker of torch illuminates the patch of surface that plays with ghosts of our minds; cities are the cramped refuge of lonely souls that recoil from the void of space.

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Project:
 © Francis Harrison (
)
3 photo(s)
and 0 draft(s),
created on 20-11-2011
0 project comment(s)
,
13 photos comment(s)
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
If you had to sum up the character of Kolkata in one word, it would be "Ambi"or Ambassador, those sturdy, indestructible Indian-made copies of the Old Morris Minor. You would be hard put to find one in today's New Delhi but nearly every single cab in Kolkata is an Ambi. Built high off the road, they are ideal for a city that gets flooded sometimes more than once  a day in a Monsoon season that lasts a little longer with every passing year.

I spent a lot of time sitting in the back of an Ambi chatting to the engaging and sometimes dishonest drivers, and consequently I found myself shooting a lot of Ambi-related pics.
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Project:
 © Didier Vanderperre (
)
5 photo(s)
and 0 draft(s),
created on 09-10-2011
0 project comment(s)
,
12 photos comment(s)
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The 99 percent, is a political movement aiming at representing 99 percent of the Americans against the 1 percent that concentrate all the wealth and power. The movement originated in NY where it started to occupy a small park next to Wall Street. The movement has gathered momentum and is now spreading to Boston, Chicago and Washington DC.
This set was shot in NY.
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Project:
 © Justin Button (
)
0 photo(s)
and 0 draft(s),
created on 03-10-2011
0 project comment(s)
,
0 photos comment(s)
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Gyeongju is a small city in the south western part of South Korea. It is mostly known for it's UNESCO world heritage historical sites from the Silla period.  However, in the compact city centre, I found that daily life is bustling as usual, the markets on the streets, as in many Korean cities, give an old chaotic Asian flair among the ultra modern cafes, PC rooms and bars. I like these contrasts that happily live side by side in Korea.
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Project:
 © Justin Button (
)
0 photo(s)
and 0 draft(s),
created on 10-09-2011
0 project comment(s)
,
0 photos comment(s)
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
I went for a quick walk to buy cigarettes at 1am in Insadong, a neighborhood in Seoul. Insadong caters for tourists but after the tourists have all gone to bed the back streets come alive with the locals eating street food after a few drinks. I took a few quick snaps with the LX3 using B&W dynamic mode in camera. 
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Project:
 © Frank-Peter Lohoff (
)
4 photo(s)
and 0 draft(s),
created on 06-09-2011
0 project comment(s)
,
11 photos comment(s)
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Chinese opera (Chinese: 戏曲/戲曲; Pinyin: xìqǔ) is a popular form of drama and musical theatre in China with roots going back as far as the third century CE. There are numerous regional branches of Chinese opera, of which the Beijing opera (Jingju) is one of the most notable.

In the Yuan Dynasty (1279–1368), forms like the Zaju (雜劇, zájù, variety plays), which acts based on rhyming schemes plus the innovation of having specialized roles like Dan (旦, dàn, female), Sheng (生, shēng, male), Hua (花, huā, painted-face) and Chou (丑, chŏu, clown) were introduced into the opera. Although actors in theatrical performances of the Song Dynasty (960–1279) strictly adhered to speaking in Classical Chinese onstage, during the Yuan Dynasty actors speaking in the vernacular tongue gained precedent on stage.[3]
The dominant form of the Ming (1368–1644) and early Qing dynasties was Kunqu, which originated in the Wu cultural area. It later evolved into a longer form of play called chuanqi, which became one of the 5 melodies that made up Sichuan opera.[4] Currently Chinese operas continue to exist in 368 different forms, the best known being Beijing opera, which assumed its present form in the mid-19th century and was extremely popular in the latter part of the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911).


19th century
In Beijing opera, traditional Chinese string and percussion instruments provide a strong rhythmic accompaniment to the acting. The acting is based on allusion: gestures, footwork, and other body movements express such actions as riding a horse, rowing a boat, or opening a door. Spoken dialogue is divided into recitative and Beijing colloquial speech, the former employed by serious characters and the latter by young females and clowns. Character roles are strictly defined. Elaborate make-up designs portray which character is acting. The traditional repertoire of Beijing opera includes more than 1,000 works, mostly taken from historical novels about political and military struggles.

1912 - 1949
In traditional Chinese theater, prior to Yuan Dynasty, no plays were performed in vernacular Chinese or without singing. Opera masks of all sorts of colors were used in many Chinese operas. At the turn of the 20th century, Chinese students returning from abroad began to experiment with Western plays. Following the May Fourth Movement of 1919, a number of Western plays were staged in China, and Chinese playwrights began to imitate this form. The most notable of the new-style playwrights was Cao Yu (b. 1910). His major works — Thunderstorm, Sunrise, Wilderness, and Peking Man — written between 1934 and 1940, have been widely read in China.
In the 1930s, theatrical productions performed by traveling Red Army cultural troupes in Communist-controlled areas were consciously used to promote party goals and political philosophy. By the 1940s, theater was well established in the Communist-controlled areas.

1949 - 1985
In the early years of the People's Republic of China, the development of Beijing opera was encouraged; many new operas on historical and modern themes were written, and earlier operas continued to be performed. As a popular art form, opera has usually been the first of the arts to reflect changes in Chinese policy. In the mid-1950s, for example, it was the first to benefit under the Hundred Flowers Campaign, such as the birth of Jilin opera. Similarly, the attack in November 1965 on Beijing deputy mayor Wu Han and his historical play, Hai Rui Dismissed from Office, signaled the beginning of the Cultural Revolution. During the Cultural Revolution, most opera troupes were disbanded, performers and scriptwriters were persecuted, and all operas were banned except the eight "model operas" that had been sanctioned by Jiang Qing and her associates. Western-style plays were condemned as "dead drama" and "poisonous weeds" and were not performed. After the fall of the Gang of Four in 1976, Beijing Opera enjoyed a revival and continued to be a very popular form of entertainment both in theaters and on television.
Following the Cultural Revolution, both older and new works reappeared. Revised and banned plays from China and abroad were reinstated in the national repertoire. Many of the new plays strained at the limits of creative freedom were alternately commended and condemned, depending on the political atmosphere. One of the most outspoken of the new breed of playwrights was Sha Yexin. His controversial play "The Imposter" which dealt harshly with the favoritism and perquisites accorded party members, was first produced in 1979. In early 1980 the play was roundly criticized by Secretary General Hu Yaobang - the first public intervention in the arts since the Cultural Revolution. In the campaign against bourgeois liberalism in 1981 and the anti-spiritual pollution campaign in 1983, Sha and his works were again criticized. Through it all Sha continued to write for the stage and to defend himself and his works in the press. In late 1985 Sha Yexin was accepted into the Chinese Communist Party and appointed head of the Shanghai People's Art Theater, where he continued to produce controversial plays. Since then, he has again fallen into disfavour.

Present
Chinese opera is seldom publicly staged in the 21st century, except in formal Chinese opera houses, and during the lunar seventh month Chinese Ghost Festival in Asia as a form of entertainment to the spirits and audience
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